Negotiated Issues in an Early College Partnership: Description and Understanding through Interorganizational Theory

  • Jack Leonard University of Massachusetts Boston
Keywords: college readiness, community colleges, early college high schools, interorganizational collaboration, secondary education, resources dependency theory, stakeholder theory, learning theory

Abstract

Early college high schools are one solution to the college readiness challenge, but school-university partnerships are complex and difficult to negotiate. This case study took a close look an early college program between a state community college and a suburban high school and asked what were the negotiable items and how could interorganizational theory help clarify the motives and positions of the negotiators in order to better understand the process? Data included transcription and notes from four years of bimonthly planning meetings among institutional leaders along with individual interviews. The results provide a road-map of negotiable “sticking points” for early college high school partnerships and a framework of seven theories to facilitate understanding and successful negotiations.

Author Biography

Jack Leonard, University of Massachusetts Boston

Jack Leonard has served in education for 45 years, from pre-school to graduate school, as a teacher, administrator and school founder. He now serves as Assistant Professor and Director of the Graduate Programs in Educational Administration at the University of Massachusetts Boston. His teaching and research interests focus on urban school leadership, school reform, school-community partnerships, and the history of educational reform.

Published
2013-12-17
How to Cite
Leonard, J. (2013). Negotiated Issues in an Early College Partnership: Description and Understanding through Interorganizational Theory. Current Issues in Education, 16(3). Retrieved from https://cie.asu.edu/ojs/index.php/cieatasu/article/view/1058
Section
Articles