Implementing an Additive, College Access and Readiness Program for Latina/o High School Students in the U.S.

  • Carla Amaro-Jimenez University of Texas at Arlington
  • Holly Hungerford-Kresser University of Texas at Arlington

Abstract

 

 

In this article we draw on the experiences of a diverse group of 34 first-generation college students, collected over a year, who served as peer mentors to minority and Latina/o high school students enrolled in four Title I (low-income) high schools in the Southwest U.S. The article identifies the successes and challenges of implementing an additive, college access and readiness program that aimed to not only reduce their dropout rates but to increase the number of traditionally underserved minority and Latina/o high school students seeking a post-secondary education. Implications as well as suggestions for further research are provided.

Author Biographies

Carla Amaro-Jimenez, University of Texas at Arlington

 

 

Dr. Carla Amaro-Jiménez is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Curriculum & Instruction at the University of Texas at Arlington. Her publications have focused on equity issues related to the schooling of Latina/o, English language learners, on preparing teachers for working in culturally and linguistically diverse environments, and on the integration of technology in the classroom.

Holly Hungerford-Kresser, University of Texas at Arlington

Dr. Holly Hungerford-Kresser is an Assistant Professor of English Education in the Department of Curriculum & Instruction at the University of Texas at Arlington. Her research and publications have focused on issues related to urban schools, college readiness, and identity.

Published
2013-09-18
How to Cite
Amaro-Jimenez, C., & Hungerford-Kresser, H. (2013). Implementing an Additive, College Access and Readiness Program for Latina/o High School Students in the U.S. Current Issues in Education, 16(3). Retrieved from https://cie.asu.edu/ojs/index.php/cieatasu/article/view/1135
Section
Articles