What do Students Expect to Learn? The Role of Learner Expectancies, Beliefs, and Attributions for Success and Failure in Student Motivation

  • Christine Galbreath Jernigan

Abstract

This study uses the foreign language classroom to examine students' beliefs about learning, perceptions of goal attainment, and motivation to continue language study. Survey and interview results indicated students’ attributions for success and failure and their expectations for certain subjects’ learnability played a role in the relationship between goal attainment and volition. It appears that over-effaciousness negatively affected student motivation. For other students who felt they were "bad at languages," their negative beliefs increased their motivation to study. Suggestions for how these results apply to other disciplines and interventions for increasing student motivation are offered.

Author Biography

Christine Galbreath Jernigan
Christine Galbreath Jernigan, Ph.D Curriculum and Instruction: Foreign Language Education, holds research interests in student motivation and the affective factors that influence learning. She has taught critical thinking and research skills courses at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia. She has also taught elementary and secondary teacher education at the University of Texas at Austin. She is currently writing a guidebook for parents raising their children to speak their second language. She can be contacted at christinejernigan@yahoo.com by email or (603)963-6488 by fax.
How to Cite
Jernigan, C. (1). What do Students Expect to Learn? The Role of Learner Expectancies, Beliefs, and Attributions for Success and Failure in Student Motivation. Current Issues in Education, 7(4). Retrieved from https://cie.asu.edu/ojs/index.php/cieatasu/article/view/824
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Articles