Conflicting Discourses: A First Grade Teacher's Perceptions of Teaching with a Scripted ELA Curriculum

  • Susan A Sturm State University of New York at Fredonia
Keywords: Scripted curriculum, ELA curriculum, Common Core

Abstract

In this article, a case study is presented of an urban first grade teachers perceptions of teaching English language arts (ELA) within a district-mandated scripted curriculum. The teacher was observed during fifteen sessions of whole-class, 90-minute reading over two months and was interviewed four times. All curricular materials were analyzed, including the commercial ELA curriculum and the school district-supplied Common Core State Standards materials. Qualitative analyses revealed that the teacher possessed three discourses, or distinctive ways of acting, interacting, valuing, feeling...thinking, and believing (Gee, 2011, p. 177) which she accessed in order to talk about her experiences. The teachers three discourses were: (1) an academic discourse derived from her Masters program; (2) a professional discourse that developed during her career; and (3) a personal discourse that came to be throughout her life. The teachers discourses remained compartmentalized and possible reasons are explored, with implications for administrators, policy makers, and teachers in similar situations.

Author Biography

Susan A Sturm, State University of New York at Fredonia
Susan Sturm is an Assistant Professor of Literacy at the State University of New York at Fredonia. Her research examines the use of scripted and Common Core-aligned English language arts curricula.
Published
2014-12-22
How to Cite
Sturm, S. (2014). Conflicting Discourses: A First Grade Teacher’s Perceptions of Teaching with a Scripted ELA Curriculum. Current Issues in Education, 17(3). Retrieved from https://cie.asu.edu/ojs/index.php/cieatasu/article/view/1320
Section
Articles