An Examination of In-Service Teacher Attitudes Toward Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Implications for Professional Practice

  • Walter Chung Eastern University
  • Stephanie Chung Cairn University
  • Susan Edgar-Smith Eastern University
  • Ruth B. Palmer Eastern University
  • David Delambo University of Wisconsin-Stout
  • Weihe Huang Creating Behavioral and Educational Momentum
Keywords: teacher attitudes, autism, special education, inclusion

Abstract

Teacher attitudes can influence the successful instruction and interventions within the classroom.  The present study examined in-service teachers attitudes toward students with and without autism spectrum disorder in the United States.  A total of 234 teachers (pre-Kindergarten to Grade 12) from public and charter schools in a metropolitan city participated in a survey.  Participants read two scenarios, one featuring a student displaying autistic symptoms and another featuring a typical student.  They then indicated their attitudes toward each student.  Results revealed that in-service teachers perceive the student with ASD as more different from typical students and the teachers are more likely to dislike and avoid the student with ASD.  Standard regression analysis demonstrated that being female, teaching at the elementary level, and holding special education certification are predictors of a teachers positive perception of a student with autism spectrum disorder.  The implications of these findings for professional practice are discussed.

Published
2015-05-22
How to Cite
Chung, W., Chung, S., Edgar-Smith, S., Palmer, R., Delambo, D., & Huang, W. (2015). An Examination of In-Service Teacher Attitudes Toward Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Implications for Professional Practice. Current Issues in Education, 18(2). Retrieved from https://cie.asu.edu/ojs/index.php/cieatasu/article/view/1386
Section
Articles