Research into Factors Contributing to Discipline Use and Disproportionality in Major Urban Schools

  • Caven S. Mcloughlin Kent State University
  • Amity L. Noltemeyer Miami University
Keywords: Disproportionality, Suspension, Expulsion, Discipline, Urban, African American

Abstract

Major urban high poverty schools frequently use exclusionary discipline (i.e., out of school suspensions) and apply these consequences disproportionately to African American students. We explored school demographic variables predicting these two outcomes using data from 433 major urban, high poverty schools. Results suggest a different set of predictors for the overall use of suspensions than for disproportionality. Specifically, four variables significantly predicted overall suspension use (office disciplinary referrals; the proportions of African American teachers, economically disadvantaged students, and African American students) whereas only one variable significantly predicted disproportionality (percentage economically disadvantaged students). Implications, limitations and future directions are provided.

Author Biographies

Caven S. Mcloughlin, Kent State University
Professor, School Psychology Programs
Amity L. Noltemeyer, Miami University
Assistant Professor, School Psychology
Published
2010-06-27
How to Cite
Mcloughlin, C. S., & Noltemeyer, A. L. (2010). Research into Factors Contributing to Discipline Use and Disproportionality in Major Urban Schools. Current Issues in Education, 13(2). Retrieved from https://cie.asu.edu/ojs/index.php/cieatasu/article/view/303
Section
Articles