Using Bloom's Revised Taxonomy to Analyze a Reading Comprehension Instrument

  • Lorraine Dagostino University of Massachusetts at Lowell
  • James Carifio University of Massachusetts at Lowell
  • Jennifer D. C. Bauer Middlesex Community College
  • Qing Zhao University of Massachusetts at Lowell
  • Nor Hashimah Hashim Universiti Sains Malaysia
Keywords: reading comprehension, cultural background, cognitive process, Bloom’s Revised Taxomony

Abstract

Though the designers may claim otherwise, the vast majority of reading comprehension instruments measure a students mastery of specific skills, such as decoding or phonological awareness, rather than their ability to extract meaning from text. This article is the third in a series in which the researchers examine two specific Malaysian reading comprehension instruments developed by a team of researchers at the Universiti of Sains Malaysia. These tests were developed for the purpose of evaluating reading comprehension abilities of students in the primary grades (Test I for grade 1-3, Test II for grades 4-6) in Malaysia (NorHashim, 2006). In the previous studies, we established that the English version of the test was comparable to the Malay version, and that Blooms Revised Taxonomy: the Cognitive Dimension (Anderson, et al., 2001), could be used to classify the test items. In this study, we extend our prior work by comparing the Malay classification scheme with Blooms Revised Taxonomy: the Cognitive Dimension (Anderson, et al., 2001). We found that rarely did questions classified by the Malay structure as testing higher-order reading skills, such as evaluation, actually do so. Instead, most questions merely identified students reading skills, rather than comprehension. Thus, more work is needed in order to develop an instrument that actually measures the evaluative abilities of students as they interact with texts.

Author Biographies

Lorraine Dagostino, University of Massachusetts at Lowell

Lorraine Dagostino is a professor at Graduate School of Education in the University of Massachusetts Lowell. Her research interests include literacy, critical thinking and evaluative reading, theoretical issues in reading and literacy, and literature issues.

James Carifio, University of Massachusetts at Lowell

James Carifio is a professor in Psychology and Research Methods at the University of Massachusetts Lowell. He has done extensive research and publishing in the respective fields.

Jennifer D. C. Bauer, Middlesex Community College

Jennifer D. C. Bauer teaches digital media and visual art at Lowell High School, and English at the Phillips Academy, Andover Summer Session. Additionally, she is a doctoral student at the University of Massachusetts at Lowell, pursuing her Ed.D. in Language Arts & Literacy. Her research interests include Visual Arts and Literacy, Digital/New Literacies, Language Variation, Urban Education, and Culturally Responsive Pedagogy.

Qing Zhao, University of Massachusetts at Lowell

Qing Zhao recently earned her Ed.D. in Language Arts & Literacy from the Graduate School of Education, University of Massachusetts Lowell in 2013. Her research interests currently include the study of teaching and learning English as a foreign/second language (EFL/ESL) and development of EFL/ESL learners' language proficiency in both North American

and Asian learning context.

Nor Hashimah Hashim, Universiti Sains Malaysia

Nor Hashimah Hashim is a professor of education at the Universiti Sains Malaysia Her research interests include preschool education, primary school education, and curriculum studies.

Published
2015-08-19
How to Cite
Dagostino, L., Carifio, J., Bauer, J., Zhao, Q., & Hashim, N. H. (2015). Using Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy to Analyze a Reading Comprehension Instrument. Current Issues in Education, 18(2). Retrieved from https://cie.asu.edu/ojs/index.php/cieatasu/article/view/1379
Section
Articles